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  Katie Ribstein, an art education major from Sioux Falls, observes the artwork of her fellow students. Ribstein developed a lesson for her class that used crushed aluminum cans.
Black Hills State University art students in Desy Shoenewies’s classes took an interdisciplinary and environmental approach to their latest art project.

The students, elementary education and art education majors, included garbage items in their art as they developed and presented their lesson plans to their fellow classmates. The two art projects, now displayed on the third floor of Woodburn, both use recycled materials and teach a lesson beyond art.

“It is definitely important to teach the possibility of making something out of garbage – you don’t need a lot of expensive supplies to create art,” according to Katie Ribstein, an art education major from Sioux Falls.

Using famed artist Didier Triglia as an inspiration, Ribstein had her classmates create paintings out of crushed aluminum cans. Ribstein chose Didier because of his unique, colorful and chaotic designs as well as his use of recycled materials to create the art. Ribstein looks forward to incorporating sustainability into her lessons as a classroom teacher.

There are many ways to use recycled items through classroom instruction, she said noting the use of thrift store glass plates as paint palettes.

 
 Pictured from left to right, Sara Frasier, elementary education major from Spearfish, Valerie Samuelson, elementary education major from St. Onge, and Amanda Vottero, elementary education major from Rapid City, and Desy Shoenewies, assistant professor of art. Frasier, Samuelson and Vottero used recycled materials to teach a lesson on jellyfish.
Another classroom art lesson incorporated old plastic dome-shaped coffee lids, fishing line and plastic bags.  Amanda Vottero, elementary education major from Rapid City, Valerie Samuelson, elementary education major from St. Onge, and Sara Frasier, elementary education major from Spearfish, used their art lesson to teach classmates about one of the ocean’s most fascinating creatures,the jellyfish, and make a project using some of materials that threaten their habitat.

Frasier said it was a way to integrate sustainability and science with an art lesson. Aimed at the fifth-grade level, Vottero said it is a great age to start teaching about recycling.