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Black Hills Research Symposium held at BHSU announces winners

Black Hills State University student William Rob Casey, junior mass communication major from Hill City tied for best undergraduate poster presentation with his poster titled “Printing Photographic Images on Hand Coated Metal Sheets.”
Black Hills State University student Clinton Lurz (left), senior business administration major from Spearfish, tied for best undergraduate poster presentation with his poster titled “Common Stock Volatility and Dividend Policy: Evidence from Taiwan.” His faculty mentor was Dr. Sheng Yang, associate professor of business.

Black Hills State University undergraduate student Lindsay Stephens, senior English major from Spearfish, won best oral undergraduate presentation for her research titled “Here Is No Water: A Platonic Consideration of T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land.”

The best graduate student presentation was given to Jay L. Jacobs, integrative genomics graduate student from Deadwood, for his presentation titled “Isolation and determination of an antimicrobial compound extracted from Artemisia ludoviciana.”

Winners have been announced for the 13th Annual Black Hills Research Symposium held recently at Black Hills State University.

Poster presentation undergraduate winners include: William Rob Casey, junior mass communication major from Hill City, for his poster project titled “Printing Photographic Images on Hand Coated Metal Sheets” with faculty mentor Shawna Norman, adjunct instructor of photography; and Clinton Lurz, senior business administration major from Spearfish, for his poster project titled “Common Stock Volatility and Dividend Policy: Evidence from Taiwan” mentored by BHSU faculty member Dr. Sheng Yang, associate professor of business.

The award for the best oral presentation undergraduate category went to Lindsay Stephens, senior English major from Spearfish, for her presentation titled “Here Is No Water: A Platonic Consideration of T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land.” Her faculty mentor was Dr. Courtney Huse-Wika, director of the BHSU Writing Center.

The best graduate student presentation was awarded to Jay L. Jacobs, integrative genomics graduate student from Deadwood, for his presentation titled “Isolation and determination of an antimicrobial compound extracted from Artemisia ludoviciana” mentored by Dr. John Dixson, assistant professor of science.

A total of 36 undergraduate and graduate student research projects were presented this year. Disciplines included: humanities, photography, economics, psychology, political science, sociology, biology, evolutionary biology, chemistry, physics, and environmental physical science. According to Dr. Pamela Carriveau, associate professor of social science, the Black Hills Research Symposium committee was greatly impressed with the range of disciplines represented and the quality of research presented by students at this year’s symposium.

“Whether it results from conducting their own independent project or working as part of a faculty member’s research team, student research represents the epitome of experiential learning. Students experience the research process firsthand and make meaning from that experience. The purpose of the Black Hills Research Symposium is to showcase, and thereby encourage, research experience at BHSU,” says Carriveau.

The keynote speaker, Stephen Maynard Caliendo, professor of political science at North Central College, discussed the research process, focusing on the challenges researchers face when pursuing a research goal, from undergraduate students to academic faculty across all fields of study.

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