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SD CEO receives donation from F. L. Clarkson Family Foundation and Pioneer Bank and Trust

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F.L. Clarkson Family Foundation and Pioneer Bank and Trust present a donation to SD CEO. Pictured from left are: Andrea Bakeberg, assistant director, SD CEO Julie Rice, assistant vice president, Pioneer Bank and Trust and Helen Merriman, director, SD CEO.

The F.L. Clarkson Family Foundation and Pioneer Bank and Trust donated $750 to the South Dakota Center for Enterprise Opportunity (SD CEO) at Black Hills State University.  The donation supports the seventh annual Celebrating Women in Business luncheon on Friday, May 13 at the Spearfish Holiday Inn, and the seventh annual Women's Business Conference in Deadwood Friday, Oct. 21.

Luncheon and conference information and registration can be found at www.BHSU.edu/SDCEO or by phone at (605) 642-6435.

The SD CEO is partially funded by the U.S. Small Business Administration. The support given by the U.S. Small Business Administration through such funding does not constitute an expressed or implied endorsement of any of the components or participants' opinions, products or services. SD CEO operates under Cooperative Agreement SBAHQ-14-W-0018. Reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities will be made if requested at least two weeks in advance. All SBA programs and services are provided to the public on a nondiscriminatory basis. Accommodation will be provided to clients with Limited English Proficiency when requested in advance.

For more information contact: Andrea Bakeberg, S.D. Center for Enterprise Opportunity (SD CEO), 1200 University St. Unit 9511, Spearfish, SD  57799-9511, Phone: 605-642-6435, www.BHSU.edu/SDCEO.

BHSU photography professor earns international accolades

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 "The Barber Shop," a photograph by BHSU assistant professor Jerry Rawlings, was selected from over 700 entries for a portrait exhibition at uBe Art Gallery in Berkley, Calif.

Jerry Rawlings, assistant professor at BHSU, received the bronze award in the International Art Forward Competition for his photograph from the 2014 Sturgis Rally. More than 800 photographs were submitted in the competition.

Black Hills State University assistant professor Jerry Rawlings has been juried into an international competition and exhibition at the uBe Art Gallery in Berkley, Calif. Rawlings also received the bronze award in the International Art Forward Competition.

Rawlings' portrait, "The Barber Shop," was selected from over 700 entries for the uBe Art Gallery portrait exhibition titled "In My Absence."

Winn Taylor, uBe Art's proprietor and curator, said the exhibition is full of emotion, humor and soul with a wide range of imagery. The exhibition launches in May and showcases 46 portraits covering a wide spectrum of medium and genre from artists around the country.

Rawlings said it is an honor to have his photography recognized by peers.

"The portrait is a telling glimpse into an individual. I prefer shooting portraits when the individual is not aware that they are being photographed. I feel that gives me greater insight into the individual and does not give them time to put up the "faccedilade" that most of us put on when being photographed," said Rawlings.

Rawlings was also selected as the Bronze Award winner in the International Art Forward competition titled "Show and Sell." Rawlings was selected for the third place award from approximately 800 submissions with his photograph from the 2014 Sturgis Rally.

The goal of the Art Forward contest is to provide exposure to contemporary artists and photographers. Rawlings' work will be published and seen by an estimated 700,000 art patrons through the Blouin International Gallery Guide distributed in galleries and museums throughout the world.

BHSU to award honorary doctorate to former Presidential advisor during spring commencement ceremony

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Black Hills State University will award an honorary doctorate to Jodi Archambault-Gillette, former special assistant to President Barack Obama for Native American Affairs, during the University's 171st Commencement Ceremony Saturday, May 7 at 10 a.m. in Donald E. Young Sports and Fitness Center. Gillette will address the campus community during a public presentation Friday, May 6 at 1 p.m. in Meier Hall. Photo credit: Tracey Brown, Papercamera

Black Hills State University will award an Honorary Doctorate to Jodi Archambault-Gillette, former special assistant to President Barack Obama for Native American Affairs, during the 171st Commencement Ceremony Saturday, May 7 at 10 a.m.

In addition to her commencement address to graduates, Gillette will also present a special lecture Friday, May 6 at 1 p.m. in Clare & Josef Meier Recital Hall at BHSU. Both events are free and open to the public.

Gillette, an enrolled member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, grew up in South Dakota and spent her formative years on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Reflecting on that time in her life, she said she feels lucky to have close connections to relatives and to traditions, experiences which continue to impact her work to this day.

"There is still so much richness and important thought about how to live on this earth that is hardwired into the Lakota culture," said Gillette. "That worldview is a huge asset of the Dakotas."

While living in the town of Kyle on Pine Ridge, Gillette recalls her mother, Elizabeth Nelson Archambault, taking classes and playing fast-pitch softball at BHSU. Elizabeth eventually became a kindergarten teacher but was first "a wicked softball shortstop," says Gillette.

The Black Hills continue to be a source of inspiration for Gillette and her family.

"Black Hills State is in the most beautiful part of the country, right in the Black Hills. That should be seen as a real source of strength and good energy to do great things," says Gillette.

With parents that were both educators, Gillette jokes that she had no choice to be a life-long advocate for children and families. She earned her bachelor's degree in government and Native American studies from Dartmouth College in 1991. The award of a BUSH Fellowship in 2002 paved the way for Gillette to pursue her master's degree in public administration from the University of Minnesota.

Her work with get-out-the-vote efforts for the 2008 election was noticed by the Obama Administration. After being appointed in 2009 as the first Native American to hold the position of deputy associate director of intergovernmental affairs, Gillette then served as a special assistant to President Barack Obama on Native American Affairs.

While in the White House, Gillette worked to resolve long-standing disputes between the United States and Indian nations. One such issue with national level implications and local level impact was Keepseagle versus USDA, a class-action lawsuit crediting Native American farmers and ranchers who applied for credit and faced discrimination.

"These ranchers and farmers knew something was wrong. They looked around the region and saw that they weren't getting the help their neighbors were receiving. For too long Indian tribes have brought up issues like this and have been ignored," said Gillette. "We had a lot of success turning that chapter and achieved several important milestones."

Gillette also created the White House Native American Affairs Council to increase the visibility of Native American issues at the

BHSU University Honors students to defend thesis, graduate as first international university scholars

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Alicia Benz, biology major, from Killdeer, N.D., will present her Honors capstone defense, "In vitro Nanoparticle Cytotoxicity on Buffalo Rat Liver Cells," during the final Geek Speak lecture of the spring 2016 semester.

Ashley Ruegg, Spanish and history major from Gering, Neb., will present her Honors capstone defense, "The Islamic Moorish Influence on the Architecture in the South of Spain," during the final Geek Speak lecture of the spring 2016 semester.

Black Hills State University honors students will present two very different research projects-one measuring how much exposure to nanoparticles (used in TV, solar panels) is harmful to rat livers and one analyzing the influence of Islam on architecture in Spain, for the final Geek Speak lecture of the spring 2016 semester, Thursday, April 28 at 4 p.m. in Joy (Proctor) Krautschun Alumni/Foundation Welcome Center (Joy Center) on BHSU campus.

Alicia Benz, biology major from Killdeer, N.D., will defend her capstone project "In vitro Nanoparticle Cytotoxicity on Buffalo Rat Liver Cells," and Ashley Ruegg, Spanish and history major from Gering, Neb., will defend her Honors capstone project "The Islamic Moorish Influence on the Architecture in the South of Spain."

According to Dr. Courtney Huse Wika, director of the University Honors Program and assistant professor of English at BHSU, the Honors capstone defense is the students' opportunity to direct their own research or creative activity. They develop a project and work with a faculty committee over the course of a year to produce an Honors capstone project that is then scored and defended.

"At the defense, students introduce their project, discuss their findings, and argue its significance, and then field questions from the audience. This is usually the culmination of a student's work in the University Honors Program, so it is exciting to see what they have produced," said Huse Wika.

Benz's capstone is a part of her undergraduate research with Dr. Daniel Asunskis. For the purpose of the research, Benz had to first grow and culture buffalo rat liver cells, before exposing them to nanoparticles, which also had to be grown and put into a cell solution in a BHSU chemistry research lab. The focus of Benz's capstone was cytotoxicity in buffalo rat liver cells (ATCC, BRL-3A) that have been exposed to nanomaterials.

"The objective of the capstone research was to measure how much cell death occurs after exposure to nanoparticles, used to build everyday appliances as TV and solar panels, and to see what concentration of nanoparticles is not harmful to human body," says Benz.

Benz is currently applying for research positions across the country for a year, prior to going to medical school.

Under the mentorship of Dr. Kelly Kirk, instructor of history at BHSU, Ruegg's capstone project analyzed the influences of Moorish and Islamic culture on the architecture in southern Spain. Ruegg says that over a period of about 780 years, until 1492 when Christian forces took control of the Iberian Peninsula, the Moors and Muslims left a big imprint in southern Spain. This influence can be seen today in the architecture still standing.

"If we look at history through the architecture we can learn things we would otherwise not find in books," says Ruegg.

For the purpose of the research, Ruegg traveled to Spain in fall 2015 where she looked at the architecture, analyzing how Islamic influences still shape the architecture on the Iberian Peninsula.

"Deciding to go abr

BHSU students gain experience during public relations shadow day in Denver

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Black Hills State University mass communication and photography major from Wright, Wyo., Danielle Litaba, far left, visited KMGH-TV during a recent Shadow Day in Denver for public relations students. Litaba was one of six BHSU students to spend the day learning from public relations professionals.

Black Hills State University mass communication and photography major from Wright, Wyo., Danielle Litaba, practices meteorology broadcasting using a green screen during a recent public relations job shadow day in Denver. Litaba was one of six BHSU students to spend the day learning from public relations professionals.

Six Black Hills State University students participated in the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA)-sponsored Denver Shadow Day recently, an experience that provided a unique networking experience with PR pros in the field.

BHSU students were paired with public relations professionals from the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Colorado State University, and B Public Relations firm. The students attended and observed meetings, assisted with business research, and participated in event promotions throughout the day.

Claudia Miller, mass communication major from Letcher, said the Shadow Day experience reassured her that she chose the right major.

"I can definitely see myself working in public relations after I graduate. This opportunity helped me understand what a public relations career can include on a daily basis," said Miller.

Dr. Mary Caton-Rosser, associate professor of mass communication and BHSU Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) advisor, said the BHSU PRSSA has participated in Shadow Day for several years, noting that the students enjoy putting the skills they've learned in the classroom to work in a real operating organization.

"They get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of how things really work in PR," said Caton-Rosser. "They're making contacts for future jobs and networking."

During a networking lunch, the students rotated through tables where they met with local and national news reporters. The reporters shared advice and strategies on how public relations professionals and media can work together.

Laura Heisinger, mass communication major from Mitchell, sat in on a crisis management meeting with her host organization. She noted the value of Shadow Day and said her courses at BHSU prepared her to make the most of the experience.

"Now I'm really excited to get out into the job market after graduation and show the world what I can offer," said Heisinger. "Being able to see what public relations is all about in a live business setting made me love it even more."

Students who attended the PRSA-sponsored Denver Shadow Day include:
  • Allan Gonzalez, mass communication major from Spearfish
  • Laura Heisinger, mass communication major from Mitchell
  • Danielle Litaba, mass communication and photography major from Wright, Wyo.
  • Sumire Matsumoto, corporate communication and mass communication major from Shizuoka, Japan
  • Claudia Miller, mass communication major from Letcher
  • Shareece Tatum, mass communication major from Piedmont
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Alum reflects on “Keep New Zealand Beautiful” research experience

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Visiting the country of New Zealand was at the top of Cole Hemmah’s bucket list. Just months after graduating from Black Hills State University, Cole was offered a rare opportunity to live and work in the country known for its diverse natural beauty. Originally from Sturgis, Cole graduated from BHSU in 2018 with a degree in outdoor education. He was working in Grand Junction, Colo., as a tutor when a fellow backpacking guide reached out to him with a job offer.

Black Hills State University Swarm Committee plans for a wicked homecoming

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“Lions and tigers and Sting?” The Black Hills State University 2019 Swarm Week will be held Sept. 22-28 with the theme, “There’s No Place Like Homecoming,” inspired by the Wizard of Oz. Each year, BHSU students and the community come together to celebrate tradition and school spirit over a week of activities including the parade and homecoming football game.

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