Volume XXX, No. 6 • Feb. 10, 2006


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Music faculty present WomanSong: Recapitulation and Coda - top

Dr. Susan Hove-Pabst
Hove-Pabst

Dr. Susan Hove-Pabst, music professor at Black Hills State University, will present the fifth in a series of research-based music recitals in the recital hall of Clare and Josef Meier Hall Saturday, March 25 at 2:30 p.m.

Assisting Hove-Pabst will be Dr. Janeen Larsen, Dr. Randall Royer, Christopher Hahn, Stephen Parker, Leslie Speirs, Molly Dailey and Lori Miller, who are all faculty and associates of the BHSU music department. There is no charge to attend the recital and no reservations will be taken.

Hove-Pabst’s recital series has examined the lives and careers of women in the American popular music scene. According to Hove-Pabst, Torch Singers, those female vocalists who have used the popular song to wrench at our heartstrings, were the subject of the first research and recital. Popular Sister Groups who hit the airwaves, record shops, and eventually television provided material for the second project. Kay DeWitt, a quintessential performer of all genres, the "toast" of Washington, D.C. and President Truman’s administration, became the focus of the next biographical recital and, in fact, continues to be the muse for Hove-Pabst’s work in progress. The fourth recital examined Women Folk–the performers and writers coming out of the folk music genre. This recital also marked the introduction of Hove-Pabst’s original compositions.

The fifth WomanSong recital will revisit each of these previous topics of research and performance, thus is titled the "recapitulation." Hove-Pabst says the fifth recital will also afford an opportunity to add new material, sampling from the songs and singers of musical drama, the "femme of film and stage." This final section will bring a close to the WomanSong series, the coda.

Hove-Pabst has been at BHSU since 1988. She has a wide range of involvement in the music department and across campus. She teaches music education, sight singing and ear training, voice, guitar and music appreciation. She has been active in choir and in many musical productions, including "Company" and the tribute to Richard Rodgers. Previously Hove-Pabst organized the Black Hills Folk Festival on campus. Her work with children’s original opera gained international notice.

Hove-Pabst has been interested in the female vocalists of America’s early and mid-20th century popular music since her early childhood. Books, recordings, sheet music, film, and personal encounters have nurtured that interest. Eventually this interest led to the WomanSong recital series.



Schallenkamp interviewed by South Dakota Public Radio - top

Dr. Kay Schallenkamp
Schallenkamp

Dr. Kay Schallenkamp, who was recently selected to serve as the next president at Black Hills State University, was interviewed on South Dakota Public Radio this week.

Schallenkamp, who is currently president of Emporia State University in Kansas, will begin at BHSU in July. In the radio interview conducted by South Dakota Public Radio staff member Julia Monczunski, Schallenkamp discussed the potential of the university and her plans for BHSU.

An archived audio of the interview is available on the South Dakota Public Radio website.



American Indian Health Research Program establishes a new location - top

Staff members of the American Indian Health Research Program at Black Hills State University are hosting an open house Monday, Feb. 13, from noon to 3 p.m., at their new location at 1246 St. Joe Street in Spearfish (across the street and east of the tennis courts on the BHSU campus). Staff members include: front row, left to right, Kathryn Langwell, M.A., interim director of the program; Mary Rogers, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology; back row, left to right, Jake Melson, research assistant who is a senior sociology and human services major from Truman, Minn.; Peter Gezzi, research assistant who is a senior sociology and human services major from Rapid City; Victoria Grey Owl, Ph.D., R.D., researcher; and Steve Andersen, D.B.A., assistant professor of health administration.

Staff members not pictured are: Daniel Farrington, D.V.M., Ph.D., serves as principal investigator for the Project EXPORT grant. Rob Schurrer, Ph.D., professor and director of the wellness management program; Jace DeCory, M.A., assistant professor of Indian Studies; and Amie Weglin, research assistant who is a senior sociology and human services major from Spearfish.

BHSU American Indian Health Research Program staff

The American Indian Health Research Program at Black Hills State University is holding an open house Monday, Feb. 13, from noon to 3 p.m., at their new location at 1246 St. Joe Street in Spearfish.

Community members, BHSU students, faculty, and employees, and others who are interested in the program are invited.

The American Indian Health Research Program (AIHRP) was started in fall 2002 when BHSU and the Montana-Wyoming Tribal Leaders Council were awarded a three-year, $1.05 million Project EXPORT grant from the National Institutes for Health/National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities to conduct research and provide community education about American Indian health disparities. Since then, BHSU faculty members associated with the AIHRP have conducted 12 collaborative research studies with six tribes in Montana and Wyoming under this initial grant.

Daniel Farrington, D.V.M., Ph.D., serves as principal investigator for the Project EXPORT grant. BHSU faculty members who have led research, outreach and mentoring programs under the grant include Steve Andersen, D.B.A., assistant professor of health administration; Rob Schurrer, Ph.D., professor and director of the wellness management program; Mary Rogers, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology; Jace DeCory, M.A., assistant professor of Indian Studies; and Kathryn Langwell, M.A., visiting assistant professor of health economics. Three BHSU seniors who are majoring in sociology and human services are working as research assistants at the center. The students, Jake Melson, from Truman, Minn.; Peter Gezzi, from Rapid City; and Amie Weglin, from Spearfish, work with staff members on current projects.

In the last four years, several additional grants for research on American Indian health topics have been awarded to BHSU and its tribal organization partners. In the fall of 2003, the Montana-Wyoming Tribal Leaders Council was awarded a three-year, $1 million Minority Research Infrastructure Support Program grant by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, HHS. BHSU is a sub-grantee to the Tribal Leaders Council. Andersen and Langwell are conducting research to measure tribal members satisfaction and experiences with receiving services from the Indian Health Service.

Schurrer and Victoria Grey Owl, Ph.D., BHSU researcher, are conducting a study to increase rates of screening for cervical cancer on the Wind River (WY) Reservation.

The Tribal Leaders Council has also contracted with BHSU to conduct an evaluation of their 30-month grant for Building Community Supports for Indian People with Diabetes, awarded in 2004 by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Langwell and Grey Owl are leading the evaluation project.

Other funded research being conducted by faculty and other researchers associated with the American Indian Health Research Program includes a two-year, $500,000 grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This award, facilitated through Senator Tim Johnson’s office and lead by principal investigators Rogers and Dr. Charles Schad, is structured to identify and disseminate information on effective strategies for producing improved outcomes for children born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and to evaluate the value of the information for teachers, juvenile justice system workers, and others. Under the grant, a two-day workshop for professionals who work with children with FAS will be held in Rapid City March 13-14, with additional one-day workshops offered in Eagle Butte and Mission during late March. The Aberdeen Area Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board is a partner with BHSU on this grant and is conducting educational programs for prevention with fifth through eighth graders in Pine Ridge and Rapid City.

The American Indian Health Research Program has also partnered with the University of South Dakota School of Medicine, Montana-Wyoming Tribal Leaders Council, Aberdeen Area Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board, and Sinte Gleska University for a five-year, $7.4 million Center for Excellence in Health Disparities Research grant that was awarded in fall 2005. The BHSU component on this grant includes designing and conducting programs to prevent and reduce obesity in American Indian children on ten reservations in Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota and research on the relationship between cultural resiliency and adolescent risk behaviors that will be conducted with the Crow Tribe and with the Fort Peck Tribes in Montana.

Other funded research underway or recently completed by the program’s researchers includes evaluation of a pilot program for reducing SIDS and FAS on the Pine Ridge Reservation, under a Wellmark Foundation grant to the Aberdeen Area Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board. The staff members are also working on the development of a catalogue of data available to study American Indian/Alaska Native health and well-being issues, under the assistant secretary of planning and evaluation award to Westat, a high level statistical research firm based in Maryland.

For more information, contact Langwell, interim director of the American Indian Health Research Program, Black Hills State University, at 642-6627 or KathrynLangwell@bhsu.edu.



Susanne Skyrm will perform “A Recital of Latin American Piano Music” at BHSU - top

Black Hills State University will host “A Recital of Latin American Piano Music” performed by Dr. Susanne Skyrm Sunday, Feb. 12 at 2:30 p.m. in the recital hall in Clare and Josef Meier Hall.

Skyrm, a fortepianist and founding member of the period instrument touring ensemble Dakota Baroque and Classic Company, has performed as a piano soloist and collaborative artist throughout the United States and Europe. She also teaches studio piano, class piano, and piano literature at the University of South Dakota. She specializes in both modern and early piano and combines performing with her research interests in Spanish and Latin American keyboard music.

Her performance, “A Recital of Latin American Piano Music,” grew from a summer seminar at the University of Texas-Austin, for which she was awarded one of 12 fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). The seminar was taught by Dr. Gerard Behague, an eminent Latin American music scholar.

While attending the seminar, Skyrm was able to research the notable holdings of the University of Texas-Austin music library and found music that is rarely heard in the United States. As part of her research project, she traced the influence of native and folk elements on the art music of Latin America.

Skyrm’s CD Treasures of Iberian Keyboard Music on the Antunes Fortepiano (Music and Arts), which was recorded on a rare 1767 Portuguese piano at the National Music Museum in Vermillion, received critical acclaim. She has also received numerous awards for her performances, including awards from the Mason and Hamlin state and regional auditions and the Cincinnati Three Arts Foundation.

Skyrm has performed for professional societies throughout the world and has given workshops on Spanish and Latin American keyboard music for teacher groups in the Midwest. She is a frequent presenter at the Diego Fernandez International Symposium on Spanish Keyboard Music, held annually in Mojácar, Spain, and is currently involved in a project to catalogue and identify 19th Century keyboard manuscripts in the monastery of San Pedro de las Dueñas outside of León.

As a recent recipient of a Governor’s 2010 Seed Grant, Skyrm is currently compiling and editing a collection of 18th Century Spanish keyboard music to be published in the next two years.

The BHSU recital is open to the public at no cost. For more information, contact Janeen Larsen at 642-6241 or JaneenLarsen@bhsu.edu.


History Day Competition will be held on campus in March - top

Black Hills State University will host the 2006 District Six National History Day Competition Wednesday, March 22 on the BHSU campus. Registration begins at 12:30 p.m. outside the Jacket Legacy Room in the David B. Miller Yellow Jacket Student Union.

National History Day is a nonprofit education program dedicated to improving the teaching and learning of history in elementary and secondary schools. More than 700,000 young people annually participate in district, state, and national competitions.

A first or second place award in the District Six competition, which comprises much of western South Dakota, allows students to advance to the state competition scheduled for Saturday, April 22. Winners from the state competition then go on to Washington, D.C., for the national competition June 11-15.

The theme for 2006 is "Taking a Stand in History: People, Ideas, Events." In response to the theme, students may submit a paper, create an exhibit, do a performance, or develop a documentary. Students may enter as individuals or in groups. There are two categories: the junior division, grades six through eight, and the senior division, grades nine through 12. Last year nearly 150 students representing seven schools brought projects to the District Six competition. Forty of those students advanced to the state competition.

According to David Wolff, BHSU associate history professor and District Six coordinator, History Day competitions are excellent opportunities for students to become engaged in history and to develop the skills of researching, writing, and critical thinking.

Students must work with their high school or middle school social science or history teacher to enter the History Day competition. All students must pre-register by Wednesday, March 15. For more information or to register for the District Six competition, contact Wolff at 642-6221 or DavidWolff@bhsu.edu.


Black Hills State University to host high school art program - top

Artist Dale Lamphere, Sturgis, gives recommendations to Anne Ellingson, Bison, during a summer art program held at Black Hills State University last year. Nominations are now being accepted for high school students to attend the program this summer on the campus of BHSU.

Artist Dale Lamphere gives recommendations to Anne Ellingson during last year's summer art program at BHSU

Black Hills State University announces plans for its annual high school visiting artists summer program June 19-23.

High school juniors and seniors who are nominated by their high school art teachers will be eligible to attend. A total of 16 students from across the state will be chosen. This year the attendees will work with two artists: Dave Wilson, a well known mixed media artist who is an art professor at BHSU; and Jessie Palczewski, a recent BHSU art graduate who also earned a graduate degree from the University of North Dakota.

“Last year we had a very successful art camp, so we are excited to offer it again this year,” said Jim Knutson, BHSU art professor and coordinator of the summer visiting artist program. He added that students will stay in a residence hall on campus during the week-long session which culminates with a closing picnic lunch and showcase of the artwork created.

The deadline for nominations is Wednesday, March 1. For details contact Knutson at 642-6104 or email JamesKnutson@bhsu.edu.



Wheaton to visit area schools - top

Tom Wheaton, assistant director of admissions at Black Hills State University, will discuss college plans with students at 17 area high schools next week. All times are given in Central Standard Time (CST).

Wheaton will visit the following schools Monday, Feb. 13: Mt. Vernon High School from 8:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.; Mitchell High School from 10:30 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.; Ethan High School from 11:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; Parkston High School from 1 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.; and Freeman High School from 2:30 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Tuesday, Feb. 14, Wheaton will visit Canistota High School from 8:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.; Lennox High School from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.; Parker High School from 11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.; Platte High School from 2:30 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Wednesday, Feb. 15, Wheaton will visit Dell Rapids High School from 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.; Harrisburg High School from 10:45 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.; and Bon Homme High School, Tyndall, from 2 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.

Thursday, Feb. 16, Wheaton will visit Yankton High School from 8 a.m. to 8:20 a.m.; Menno High School from 9:35 a.m. to 10 a.m.; and Vermillion High School from 11:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Wheaton will conclude his week Friday, Feb. 17 at Geddes High School from 11:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.; and Chamberlain High School from 12:45 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.

High school students needing information about college costs, financial aid, housing, and academic information should plan to visit with Wheaton. For more information contact the BHSU Admissions Office at 1-800-ALL-BHSU or view the BHSU website at www.bhsu.edu.


Krautschun women's basketball scholarship fund increased - top

Harvey and Joy Krautschun, Spearfish, recently donated $5,000 to the Joy Proctor Krautschun Scholarship Fund at Black Hills State University.

This scholarship fund was originally set up in 1999 by June and the late T.H. Proctor who donated $100,000 via a charitable remainder trust. Interest from the deferred scholarship fund will be distributed to female basketball players to honor Joy Krautschun, the first head women's basketball coach at BHSU who coached in the mid 70s.

Joy is a 1973 graduate of BHSU with a physical education major and a music minor. As a student, she was involved in the dance program at the university, was a cheerleader and was involved in intramural sports. Joy taught physical education and music in the Lead/Deadwood and Spearfish School districts.

For many years, Joy was an active member of Spearfish community and served with the Spearfish Ambassadors. Joy was a member of the Alumni Association board of directors for many years and her husband was past president of the Alumni Association and is a current member of the BHSU Foundation board of directors. They are now both emeritus members of the alumni board.


University Assessment Committee minutes - top

The University Assessment Committee met Monday, Feb. 6 in the Meier Hall Conference Room from 12 noon to 1 p.m.

Present were: D. Wessel, Alsup, Siewert, Earley, Hagerty, S. Hupp, Romkema, and Sarkar. C. Cremean and Sickler were absent.

Assessment plans for writing intensive and undergraduate research requirements:

  • Business
    • Writing intensive plan accepted.
    • Undergraduate research plan accepted.
    • Global issues plan accepted.
  • Communication arts/mass communications
    • Writing intensive plan sent back for revision. More details are needed, and goals and objectives need to be those in the catalog.
    • Undergraduate research plan sent back for revision and resubmission. More details are needed, and goals and objectives need to be those in the catalog.
  • History
    • Writing intensive plan sent back for revision and resubmission. Need to explain use of rubric and provide more details.
    • Undergraduate research plan sent back for revision and resubmission. Need to explain use of rubric and provide more details on assessment.
  • Human services
    • Writing intensive plan sent back for revision and resubmission. Need to explain use of rubric and provide more details.
    • Undergraduate research plan sent back for revision and resubmission. Need to explain use of rubric and provide more details on assessment.
  • Music
    • Writing intensive plan sent back for revision and resubmission. Need details on the projects and how they fit into assessments. Use of a rubric also questioned.
    • Creative activity plan sent back for revision and resubmission. Goals and outcomes should be those in the catalog. The committee liked outcome 1, but  outcome 2 needed more details.

Globalization/global issues requirement:

  • The committee discussed the globalization/global issues requirement but did not arrive at a conclusion as to the best means to do assessment on this requirement. The committee did agree that the chair should ask faculty or chairs of those courses listed as fulfilling the global requirement how they are meeting that requirement.

The next meeting of the University Assessment Committee will be Monday, Feb. 27 from 12 noon to 1 p.m. in the Meier Hall Conference Room.


Grant opportunities announced - top

Below are program materials received in the Grants Office, Woodburn 212, through Thursday, Feb. 9. For copies of the information, contact the office at 642-6204 or e-mail requests to grants@bhsu.edu. Fellowship information will also be posted on the Student Union bulletin board near the information desk.

Advanced Learning Technologies (ALT)

Through the Advanced Learning Technologies (ALT) program, the CISE and EHR Directorates of National Science Foundation support research that (1) enables radical improvements in learning through innovative computer and information technologies, and (2) advances research in computer science, information technology, learning, and cognitive science through the unique challenges posed by learning environments and learning technology platforms. Integrative research approaches that build across disciplines and establish tight linkages among theory, experiment, and design are strongly encouraged. Technology goals may include systems for tutoring or assessment, modeling and sensing of cognitive or emotional states, context awareness, natural language interfaces, collaboration, knowledge management, and non-traditional goals that redefine the roles of technology in learning. Educational foci for ALT projects must include an area of science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM), or general cross-cutting skills directly relevant to STEM.

Deadline: May 4, 2006. The link to the full announcement can be found at www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&oppId=7927.


FY 2006 DCI Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program
(Department of Defense, National Geospatial Intelligence Agency)

The Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) and DS&T’s Chief Scientist announce a Fiscal Year 2006 competition for the DCI Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program. The mission of the DCI Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program is to establish long-term relationships and mentoring of postdoctoral researchers and to provide research institutes with an understanding of the Intelligence Community’s research requirements. The program fosters partnerships with postdoctoral researchers as they move into career positions and provide innovative solutions to critical Intelligence Community problems. The FY 2006 program has 47 topic areas of interest. The Broad Agency Announcement (BAA), with all pertinent information, will be posted on the NGA website at www.nga.mil under the Business Opportunities tab on February 17, 2006.

Deadline: April 14, 2006. For more information see www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&oppId=7928.


Faculty Research and Instructional Improvement Committees remind faculty of deadlines - top

Proposals for funding through the Instructional Improvement Committee will be accepted through Friday, Feb. 24 for consideration at the March meeting. Proposals must consist of the proposal and budget outlines following the specified format available on the Grants and Special Projects web page.

The Faculty Research Committee has funds available for the current fiscal year. Applications to be considered at the next meeting need to be submitted by Wednesday, Feb. 22. Complete guidelines are available on the BHSU Grants & Special Projects website.

Proposals are now being accepted electronically. To submit a proposal electronically, attach it to an email and send it to PeggyGubbrud@bhsu.edu; however, a signed original must also be submitted to the Grants Office, Unit 9504, or delivered to Woodburn Hall 212.


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