Volume XXIX, No. 35 • Sept. 9, 2005


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Bukralia named director of library learning center - top

Rajeev Bukralia (left), who was recently named director of the E.Y. Berry Library Learning Center at Black Hills State University, says the library has a capable and dedicated staff who will work together to accomplish the goals he has outlined to enhance library services. Library staff members include: (left to right) Bukralia; Bobbi Sago, Special Collections; Alicia Caldanaro, reference and government documents; Scott Ahola, acquisition and workstudy employment; Karen Stacy, curriculum and interlibrary loan; Valerie Hawkins, cataloging; and Melora Torp, circulation and reserves.

Members of the E.Y. Berry Library Learning Center

Rajeev Bukralia has been named director of the E.Y. Berry Library Learning Center at Black Hills State University. Bukralia has served as systems librarian at the library since 2002.

Bukralia, who has a strong information technology background as well as extensive library experience, has several goals for the library including improving the collections as well as enhancing and promoting the special collections area.

Dr. Dean Myers, vice president for academic affairs at BHSU, says Bukralia was chosen because he is clearly the best person for the job.

“Rajeev’s leadership skills, his technology expertise and his relationship with the university faculty members make him an excellent choice to succeed Ed Erickson. His enthusiasm is contagious and will serve him well as director,” Myers says.

Bukralia, who has been proactive in finding innovative ways to use technology at the library, is enthusiastic about his new role as director of the library and has many plans and goals to enhance services at the library. He stressed that the library will have a renewed focus on serving students and faculty.

“We are here for the students and faculty. That’s our main purpose. We will seek new ways to efficiently meet the needs of students and faculty,” Bukralia says.

Bukralia noted that in recent years the BHSU library instituted some rather unorthodox changes including the establishment of a coffee shop right in the library, offering checkout of laptop computers, and providing other services at the library. These changes have resulted in an increase in the number of students who use the library at a time when many libraries are seeing a decline in their numbers.

“The gate count at the BHSU library has increased dramatically in recent years. BHSU has instituted some creative ideas to engage students in library. It’s a place for students to come to and learn,” Bukralia says. “People are using the library in different ways. Students meet to work on projects or come in to work with their tutors.”

“We are an information depository and we can provide many resources for faculty and students. We need to understand the needs of faculty and students so we can find ways to play a greater role in meeting their needs. My focus is to find ways to meet those needs,” Bukralia says.

Bukralia says collection development is one of his priorities and he plans to use technological means, along with personal feedback from faculty and students, to determine the most effective and useful ways to improve the collection.

Bukralia noted that he is very proud of the Special Collections in the library and will seek to strengthen collections and make them more available for the public. He plans a strong effort to preserve and catalog the special collections in the library.

“We have many items that are unique. The special collections are a world-class niche for Black Hills history,” Bukralia says.

As the school year begins, Bukralia is assessing ways to improve the workflow at the library to provide personalized and efficient service to the students and faculty. He noted that the library, with a staff of only nine full-time employees, relies heavily on student workers. Bukralia is optimistic about the future of the library and is anxious to begin instituting new services and finding ways to enhance the library collections.

Bukralia acknowledges the importance of teamwork in achieving the library objectives. He believes the library has a capable and dedicated staff that will accomplish the goals of providing improved library services to the university community.

In the past three years, Bukralia has spearheaded many technological changes at the library that have set the stage for the university to provide enhanced services for students as well as faculty and staff.

Bukralia notes that the BHSU library has a legacy of being on the cutting edge of changes and advancements. BHSU’s library was the first to implement a fully-automated library card system in South Dakota. The system, implemented at BHSU in 1986, was later adopted by the South Dakota Library Network (SDLN) and is used by nearly 65 libraries in the state. The statewide SDLN office is located in lower level of the BHSU library.

In his position as systems librarian at BHSU, Bukralia planned, analyzed and executed many projects including the new library automation system, proxy server, BHSU student password system and library website enhancements. Bukralia conceived, designed, implemented, and managed a secure proxy server system so that off-campus users can use electronic research databases at anytime and from anywhere. He has also taught workshops in web design, using spreadsheets, e-commerce for business and bibliographic instruction classes on utilizing library resources for research needs. In 2004, Bukralia was recognized with the outstanding university service award.

Before coming to BHSU, Bukralia served as a business and technology consultant for business promotion, e-commerce, enterprise resource planning (ERP), and management information systems. He also developed an interactive online testing system, designed websites, and developed e-commerce applications for several companies. Previously he was CEO and founder of The Inspiration Courses in New Delhi, India, where he launched and managed an institute to train students for various higher learning entrance tests and provide vocational training. The institution served over 35,000 disadvantaged youth throughout India in four years.

Bukralia earned a master of science degree in information systems from Dakota State University. He has a book publishing post graduate degree from the University of Delhi in India as well as a bachelor of science degree with majors in chemistry, botany and zoology from the University of Delhi.


Romkema named chair of Management and Marketing Department - top

Priscilla Romkema
Romkema

Dr. Priscilla Y. Romkema, associate professor at Black Hills State University, has been named as the chair of the Management and Marketing Department in the College of Business and Technology.

Romkema has been a faculty member at BHSU since the fall of 1997 and has served as the director of the BHSU Center for Business and Entrepreneurship since 1999. She also serves as the coordinator for entrepreneurship and business education programs.

Dr. Amin Sarkar, dean of the College of Business and Technology, says Romkema was chosen to lead this department for a number of reasons.

“Dr. Priscilla Romkema is one of the finest people-oriented persons at the university and I am so pleased that she agreed to become the chair for the Department of Management and Marketing,” Sarkar said. “Recently, we have made significant changes in our business programs, both at the bachelor’s and master’s levels. The modified programs are now among the top business programs in the nation. We also plan to recruit additional quality faculty members with Ph.D. degrees. I will look forward to working with Priscilla in these endeavors.”

Romkema has a Ph.D. in education from the University of Wyoming, a master of science in business education from the University of Wyoming, and a bachelor of science in instrumental music and teacher certification in business from Black Hills State University. Her teaching background includes faculty positions at the University of Wyoming in Laramie, Wyo.; Northern Michigan University in Marquette, Mich.; and the Independent Institute of Russian Entrepreneurship in Moscow, Russia. In addition to her faculty positions, she served as a training advisor with the Environmental Policy and Technology Project in Russia and as an office manager in London, England.

Romkema is involved in many community organizations. She is currently the president of the Spearfish Economic Development Corporation (SEDC) Board of Directors, Area 1 District 12 director of Zonta International and a member of the Spearfish Zonta Club, president-elect of the National Association for Business Teacher Education (NABTE), Mountain-Plains Representative to the International Society for Business Education (ISBE) executive board, past president and current member of the Northern Hills Rotary Club, past president of the Spearfish Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors, and current member of the Spearfish Area Community Foundation Board. Other memberships/affiliations include the National Business Education Association (NBEA), Sigma Beta Delta, and Kappa Delta Pi.

The College of Business and Technology at BHSU consists of three departments: Accounting and Economics, Management and Marketing, and Industrial and Information Technology. With nearly 800 business students, BHSU has the largest business school in South Dakota in terms of the number of students enrolled in business courses.

Sarkar noted that recent modifications in the business bachelor’s degree, including curriculum changes and degree modifications, have enhanced the business administration program at BHSU.

“The bachelor’s degree in business administration at BHSU, after its recent modification, is one of the best programs the region including South Dakota,” Sarkar said. He noted that this year the university will apply for the highest level of business accreditation from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) International.


Professors invited to publish article about the redesign of computer course - top

Jean Johnson
Johnson
Pat Mackin
Mackin

An article authored by Pat Mackin and Jean Johnson, assistant professors in the College of Business and Technology at Black Hills State University, and Sharon Paranto, Northern State University professor, will be published in the 2004 edition of the Information Systems Education Journal (ISEDJ).

The article, entitled “Redesign of Introduction to Computers Course,” was first accepted for presentation at the Information Systems Education Conference (ISECON) in November 2004. A copy of the paper was published in the conference proceedings. After undergoing a second peer review, the paper was selected for publication in the ISEDJ.

According to the authors, the paper was the result of the development of a “flexibly-structured” model for teaching the MIS 105: Introduction to Computers course. In the paper, the authors discuss reasons why the course redesign was completed, how the new design works, results of the analysis of the first year of implementation, and suggestions for course improvement. The methodology discussed in the article will again be implemented in the MIS 105 course this year.

Mackin, who joined the BHSU faculty in 2002, has a bachelor’s degree in accounting and a master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Montana. He received his doctorate in business administration from Arizona State University.

Johnson received a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in mathematics from the University of South Dakota. She has been a member of the BHSU faculty since 1986.


Royer will present research at music teacher symposium - top

Randy Royer
Royer

Dr. Randall Royer, music professor at Black Hills State University, will present research at the Society for Music Teacher Education Symposium in Greensboro, N. C., Sept. 15-17.

Royer will make a presentation on his recent research, "High School All-State Musicians and Their Interest in the Music Education Professions." Royer surveyed all-state musicians in three performing groups, bands, choirs, and orchestras, in five different states, South Dakota, North Dakota, Wyoming, Montana and Minnesota, to gauge those students' interest in the music education professions. His findings indicated that less than 10 percent of those responding to the survey indicated they were interested in pursuing a career in music education.

According to Royer, the purpose of the symposium is to initiate a sustained exploration of current critical issues in music teacher education. Three broad areas of critical need are finding future music educators, preparing future music educators, and supporting the professional development of music educators.

Royer holds a master’s degree in music education from the University of Wyoming. He received his doctorate in music education from the University of Utah in 1996 and joined the BHSU faculty in 1997.


Altmyer receives handcrafted wooden disc and Mach 5 disc golf basket from PDGA - top

Don Altmyer, Spearfish, displays the handcrafted wooden disc and custom-painted portable Mach 5 disc golf basket that he received when he won the Advanced Grandmaster Division at the 2005 Professional Disc Golf Association (PDGA) Amateur World Disc Golf Championship at a tournament held in Flagstaff, Ariz., this summer. Altmyer, a College of Business and Technology associate professor, was instrumental in developing a disc golf course on the BHSU campus in 1995. Since then, students and community members have embraced the sport. The 10th annual anniversary tournament of the BHSU Disc Golf Course is set for Sunday, Sept. 25 at 10 a.m. Walk-in registration is available beginning at 9 a.m. There will be five divisions.

The 9th Annual Swarm Days Disc Golf Tournament is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 22. Students begin at 3:30 p.m. The community members’ tournament begins at 5 p.m. For more information contact Altmyer at 642-6266.

The BHSU Bookstore sells golfing discs and has a display featuring an aerial map of the course and a mini-basket as well as a custom display rack featuring 100 discs with custom-stamped college logos. To date, the bookstore has sold over 2,000 discs and has supported campus tournaments by sponsoring prizes. The course begins on the northwest side of the campus behind Thomas Hall, with maps and scorecards located on the wooden bench next to Hole 1.

Disc golf is played much like traditional golf. Instead of a ball and clubs, however, players use a flying golfing disc from a tee area to a target, an elevated metal basket with a hanging array of chains to catch the disc. When the disc lands in the basket the hole is completed.



BHSU will celebrate opening of Little Jacket Learning Center - top

Black Hills State University will host a grand opening celebration for the Little Jacket Learning Center, formerly the BHSU child care center, Wednesday, Sept. 14 from 2 to 4 p.m.

Throughout the celebration, tours of the center, which is located just west of the BHSU campus at 1307 W. Oliver Street in Spearfish, will be given by children who currently attend the center along with an adult. A brief program will begin at 2:30 p.m. Magician Kirk Kokinos will provide entertainment for the children during the program.

Staff members at the Little Jacket Learning Center are excited to have the center located near campus after a two-year hiatus when the center was relocated at a site which was some distance from the campus. Diane Mabey, director of the center, says the location and the new facility are excellent and she is proud to welcome students, faculty and community members to tour the center.

Last year, thanks to a community development grant of $215,700, BHSU was able to begin renovations at its current Oliver Street location, one block west of the university. The new location is much more accessible for the parents of the approximately 60 children who attend the center. It also provides students in the early childhood education degree program at BHSU the chance to observe and conduct special activities at the center.

Community members are welcome to attend the grand opening. Refreshments will be served. For more information, contact the Little Jacket Learning Center at 642-6322.


Writing the West series will feature author Ann Ronald - top

Author Ann Ronald will kick off the 2005-06 “Writing the West” series at Black Hills State University Friday, Sept. 16 from 3 to 5 p.m. in Jonas Hall room 305.

Ronald’s topic will be “Ghosts of the American West,” the subject of both her most recent book, Ghost West, and her upcoming book. She has also written a book on Western iconoclast Edward Abbey.

According to David Cremean, assistant professor of humanities and director of the Bush Grant at BHSU, Ronald does not use the term ghosts in the sense it is normally used, but in the sense that much of the West has a haunted character to it. Ghost West includes a chapter on South Dakota’s Mount Rushmore and Crazy Horse Memorials. Copies of the book will be available for purchase at the presentation.

The “Writing the West” series, which is sponsored by a Bush Grant, brings Western writers, particularly those who write primarily about interdisciplinary subjects, to the BHSU campus.

Ronald’s presentation is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Cremean at 642-6713 or DavidCremean@bhsu.edu.


Chiesman Committee will honor 218th birthday of the U.S. Constitution - top

In honor of the 218th birthday of the U.S. Constitution, the Black Hills State University Chiesman Committee will be hosting a celebration Friday, Sept. 16 from 12 noon to 1 p.m. in the David B. Miller Yellow Jacket Student Union Jacket Legacy Room.

The gathering will feature traditional birthday fare and a panel discussion on constitutions throughout the world. Informative Bill of Rights posters, designed by BHSU students in an upper-level social studies methods course, will be available for review before and after the panel discussion.

Tom Hills, South Dakota state representative and BHSU professor emeritus, will serve as moderator for the discussion. Faculty panelists and their topics will be: Pam Carriveau, the U.S. Constitution; Micheline Hickenbotham, the European Constitution; Roger Miller, the Australian Constitution; John Glover, Native American Constitutions; and Ahrar Ahmad, the Iraqi Constitution. Each panelist will spend about 10 minutes on his/her topic.

The party is open to the public. Birthday cake, coffee, and punch will be served. For more information, contact George Earley, chair of the BHSU Chiesman Committee, at 642-6270 or GeorgeEarley@bhsu.edu.


Volunteers needed to assist the Red Cross with hurricane refugees - top

Black Hills State University is coordinating an effort to find volunteers to assist the American Red Cross with 500 hurricane evacuees who are being housed in Rapid City.

According to Michael Smith and Donna Trainum, directors of the BHSU Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) program, volunteers are needed to assist the Red Cross with more than 500 people who are being temporarily housed in Rapid City. Volunteers are needed to work 12-hour shifts from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. or from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. Volunteers will be doing a variety of tasks including preparing food, cleaning, providing transportation, helping with children and other miscellaneous duties. Students, faculty, staff and community members are encouraged to participate in this volunteer effort.

Refugees from Hurricane Katrina are arriving at Rapid City Regional Airport today and will be housed at Camp Rapid on West Main Street. The Red Cross, the Pennington County Emergency Management and the Salvation Army are working together to provide for the refugees.

To volunteer call the VISTA office at 642-6471 or stop by the VISTA office located in the David B. Miller Yellow Jacket Student Union room 120. Volunteers are required to fill out a volunteer application form and attain an identification card. Forms are available at the VISTA office.

In addition, students at BHSU are organizing several fundraising events for hurricane Katrina victims.


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