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Black Hills State University President Kay Schallenkamp congratulates undergraduate student Jennifer Johnson, who was the oral presentation winner at the Black Hills Research Symposium held recently at BHSU. Her presentation was titled “Generating Cwatsets from Multiple Graphs.”

Black Hills State University undergraduate student Samantha Brush won best poster presentation for her poster titled “Analysis of Surface Chemistry and Optical Properties in CdSe Quantum Dots” during the 14th Annual Black Hills Research Symposium held recently at BHSU.

Dr. Gregory L. Naber, professor of mathematics at Drexel University at Philadelphia, Pa. was the keynote speaker during the Black Hills Research Symposium held recently on the BHSU campus. Naber gave a talk titled "Gauge Fields and Geometry: A picture book."

Winners have been announced for the 14th Annual Black Hills Research Symposium held recently at Black Hills State University.

The award for the best oral presentation undergraduate category went to Jennifer Johnson, mathematics major from Hettinger, N.D., for her presentation titled “Generating Cwatsets from Multiple Graphs.” Winner of the poster presentation was Samantha Brush, chemistry major from Miles City, Mont., for her presentation titled, “Analysis of Surface Chemistry and Optical Properties in CdSe Quantum Dots.”

Student research covered a wide range of topics including a cure for malaria, the venom of rattlesnakes, physics research at the Sanford Lab, experiences of Special Olympics athletes, effectiveness of an afterschool program, adolescent depression, analyzing twitter posts, the role of religion in youth literature, the power play in the tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, and more.

Approximately 70 people attended the conference. This year 34 undergraduate student research projects were presented. Disciplines included:  humanities, photography, economics, psychology, political science, sociology, biology, evolutionary biology, chemistry, physics, and environmental physical science.

“The spectrum of research topics covered by the students under the guidance of their respective advisors was very impressive,” said Dr. Parthasarathi Nag, associate professor of mathematics at BHSU. “The research topics involved collecting, processing, analyzing, interpreting, and presenting the data which leads to the valuable gain of research experience that the students accrue and which they can use in their future studies or professional work,” he said. According to Nag, the Black Hills Research Symposium provides a great opportunity for student researchers to showcase their work and research experience at BHSU.”

The keynote speaker was Dr. Gregory L. Naber, professor of mathematics at Drexel University at Philadelphia, Pa. Naber’s interests are topology, differential geometry, and mathematical physics, particularly relativity and gauge theory. He published six books in these areas with Cambridge University Press, Springer-Verlag and Dover.

“Naber gave a very insightful talk titled "Gauge Fields and Geometry: A picture book" which was followed by a brief question and answer session,” said Nag, who co-chaired this year’s symposium, along with Dr. Mike Zehfus, professor of chemistry at BHSU.