Get a degree in Mathematics.

BHSU Mathematics Programs

The Mathematics Program offers a rigorous environment that enhances mathematical maturity, self-confidence, and an appreciation for lifelong learning through relevant studies and research. The Program prepares students for many different careers from finance and software development to math education, as well as service courses for other disciplines that require a math component and aids in the preparation of teachers in elementary and middle school mathematics.

Math Assistance Center Tutoring available for all levels of mathematics. 

Why Mathematics at BHSU?

  • Small classes with knowledgeable, concerned faculty to better facilitate learning.
  • All faculty are involved in research and/or grants
  • Research opportunities are available both in pure mathematics  and mathematics education.
  • An active, award-winning math club on campus.
  • 100% employment rate of Mathematics education majors.

Mathematics Course Requirements

Mathematics 4 Year Plans

Mathematics Careers

Required Core - 29 semester hours

  • 4 MATH 123 Calculus I
  • 4 MATH 125 Calculus II 
  • 2 MATH 221 Intro: Discrete Mathematics 
  • 4 MATH 225 Calculus III
  • 3 MATH 315 Linear Algebra
  • 3 MATH 321 Differential Equations
  • 3 MATH 413 Abstract Algebra I
  • 3 MATH 425 Real Analysis I
  • 3 MATH 481 Probability and Statistics

9 Restricted Electives - take three courses from the following:

  • MATH 316 Discrete Mathematics
  • MATH 361 Modern Geometry
  • MATH 411 Theory of Numbers
  • MATH 416 Combinatorics
  • MATH 421 Complex Analysis
  • MATH 440 Mathematics of Finance
  • MATH 450 History of Mathematics
  • MATH 461 Introduction to Topology
  • MATH 487 Design of Experiments

Gen Ed Requirements - 30 semester hours

  • 3 ENGL 101 Composition I
  • 3 ENGL 201 Composition II
  • 3 SPCM Speech 101, 215, or 222
  • 6* Gen Ed - Social Science
  • 6 * Gen Ed - Arts & Humanities
  • 6-8 Gen Ed - Natural Science & Lab

    A minor is required with this major plus electives to total 120 hours, of which 36 hours
    must be 300-400 level courses.

 

Required Core - 35 semester hours

  • 4 MATH 123 Calculus I
  • 4 MATH 125 Calculus II
  • 2 MATH 221 Intro: Discrete Mathematics
  • 4 MATH 225 Calculus III
  • 3 MATH 315 Linear Algebra
  • 3 MATH 321 Differential Equations
  • 3 MATH 361 Modern Geometry
  • 3 MATH 413 Abstract Algebra I
  • 3 MATH 425 Real Analysis I
  • 3 MATH 481 Probability and Statistics
  • 3 SEED 418 7-12 Math Methods

Restricted Electives - take two courses from the following:

  • MATH 316 Discrete Mathematics
  • MATH 411 Theory of Numbers
  • MATH 416 Combinatorics
  • MATH 421 Complex Analysis
  • MATH 440 Mathematics of Finance
  • MATH 450 History of Mathematics
  • MATH 461 Introduction to Topology
  • MATH 487 Design of Experiments
 

Pre-Professional Teaching Core - 18 semester hours

  • 1 EDFN 295 Practicum: Pre-Admission Teaching
  • 2 EDFN 338 Foundations of American Education
  • 3 EPSY 302 Educational Psychology
  • 3 EPSY 428 Child & Adolescent Development
  • 3 INED 411 South Dakota Indian Studies
  • 3 PSYC 101 General Psychology (gen ed)
  • 3 SPED 100 Into to Person with Exceptionalities
 

Professional Secondary Ed Teaching Core - 24 semester hours

  • EDFN 365 Computer Based Technology & Learning
  • MLED 480 Middle Level Methods
  • SEED 408 Plan, Manage & Assess the 7-12 Diverse Classroom
  • SEED 450 Reading and Content Literacy
  • SEED 495 Practicum: Pre-Student Teaching
  • EDFN 475 Human Relations
  • SEED 488 7-12 Student Teaching
 

Gen Ed Requirements - 30 semester hours

  • 3 ENGL 101 Composition I
  • 3 ENGL 201 Composition II
  • 3 SPCM Speech 101, 215, or 222
  • 6 * Gen Ed - Social Science
  • 6 * Gen Ed - Arts & Humanities
  • 6-8 Gen Ed - Natural Science & Lab

Select math, methods, and one area of science.

Mathematics - 24 semester hours

  • 4 MATH 123 Calculus I
  • 4 MATH 125 Calculus II
  • 4 MATH 225 Calculus III
  • 3 MATH 361 Modern Geometry
  • 3 MATH 481 Probability & Statistics
  • Take two courses from the following:
    MATH 315 Linear Algebra
    MATH 413 Abstract Algebra I
    MATH 425 Real Analysis I

Methods - 5 semester hours

  • 2 SEED 413 7-12 Science Methods
  • 3 SEED 418 7-12 Math Methods

Choose one area of science:

Biology - 23 semester hours

  • 4 BIOL 151 General Biology I & 151L Lab
  • 4 BIOL 153 General Biology II 153L Lab
  • 4 BIOL 311 Principles of Ecology & 311L Lab
  • 4 BIOL 331 Microbiology & 331L Lab
  • 4 BIOL 371 Genetics & 371L Lab
  • 3 BIOL Elective

Chemistry - 20 semester hours

  • 4 CHEM 112 General Chemistry I & 112L Lab
  • 4 CHEM 114 General Chemistry II & 114L Lab
  • 4 CHEM 326 Organic Chemistry I & 326L Lab
  • 4 CHEM 328 Organic Chemistry II & 328L Lab
  • 4 CHEM 332 Analytical Chemistry & 332L Lab

Earth Science - 20 semester hours

  • 4 GEOL 201 Physical Geology & 201L Lab
  • 4 GEOL 203 Historical Geology & 203L Lab
  • 3 GEOL 321 Conservation of Natural Resources
  • 3 PHYS 185 Introduction to Astronomy & 185L Lab
  • 6 take two courses from the following five courses:
    GEOL 340 Mineralogy/Petrology
    GEOL 350 Environmental Geology
    GEOL 360 Environmental Geochemistry
    GEOL 370 Hydrogeology
    SCI 388 Global Positioning & Geographical Information Systems

Physics - 19 semester hours

  • 3 PHYS 185 Introduction to Astronomy & 185L Lab
  • 5 PHYS 211 University Physics I & 211L Lab
  • 5 PHYS 213 University Physics II & 213L Lab
  • 3 PHYS 331 Introduction to Modern Physics
  • 3 PHYS 471 Quantum Mechanics

Pre-Professional Teaching Core - 18 semester hours

  • EDFN 295 Practicum: Pre-Admission
  • EDFN 338 Foundations of American Education
  • EPSY 302 Educational Psychology
  • EPSY 428 Child & Adolescent Development
  • INED 411 South Dakota Indian Studies
  • PSYC 101 General Psychology (gen ed)
  • SPED 100 Intro to Person with Exceptionalities

Professional Secondary Ed Teaching Core - 24 semester hours

  • EDFN 365 Computer Based Technology & Learning
  • MLED 480 Middle Level Methods
  • SEED 408 Planning, Managing @ Assessing the 7-12 Diverse Classroom
  • SEED 450 Reading and Content Literacy
  • SEED 495 Practicum
  • EDFN 475 Human Relations
  • SEED 488 7-12 Student Teaching

Gen Ed Requirements - 30 semester hours

  • 3 ENGL 101 Composition I
  • 3 ENGL 201 Composition II
  • 3 MATH Gen Ed - Mathematics satisfied by major
  • 3 SPCM Speech 101, 215, or 222
  • 6 * Gen Ed - Social Science
  • 6 * Gen Ed - Arts & Humanities
  • 6-8 Gen Ed - Natural Science & Lab satisfied by major

A minor is NOT required with this major but electives are required to total 128 hours.
Students are encouraged to pursue a minor, but to be certified to teach, a content
praxis exam must be passed in both the major & minor areas of study.

* Global Requirement: depending on your selection, this requirement will satisfy 3 hours of
either Social Science or Arts & Humanities requirements. Take 1 course from AIS/HIST 257,
ANTH 210, ARTH 211/212/251, ENGL 211/212, GEOG 210, HIST 121/122/153, HUM 100,
MCOM 151, POLS 141/250

Minor in Mathematics - 18 hours

  • 4 MATH 123 Calculus I
  • 4 MATH 125 Calculus II
  • Take 10 credits from the following (3-4 classes):
    MATH 221 Intro: Discrete Mathematics (2)
    MATH 225 Calculus III (4)
    MATH 315 Linear Algebra (3)
    MATH 316 Discrete Mathematics (3)
    MATH 321 Differential Equations (3)
    MATH 361 Modern Geometry (3)
    MATH 411 Theory of Numbers (3)
    MATH 413 Abstract Algebra I (3)
    MATH 416 Combinatorics (3)
    MATH 421 Complex Analysis (3)
    MATH 425 Real Analysis I (3)
    MATH 440 Mathematics of Finance (3)
    MATH 450 History of Mathematics (3)
    MATH 461 Introduction to Topology (3)
    MATH 481 Probability and Statistics (3)
    MATH 487 Design/Analysis of Experiments (3)

Minor in Mathematics - Teaching  - 18 hours

  • 4 MATH 123 Calculus I
  • 4 MATH 125 Calculus II
  • 3 MATH 361 Modern Geometry
  • 3 SEED 418 7-12 Math Methods
  • Take 4 credits from the following (1-2 classes):
    MATH 221 Intro: Discrete Mathematics (2)
    MATH 225 Calculus III (4)
    MATH 315 Linear Algebra (3)
    MATH 316 Discrete Mathematics (3)
    MATH 321 Differential Equations (3)
    MATH 361 Modern Geometry (3)
    MATH 411 Theory of Numbers (3)
    MATH 413 Abstract Algebra I (3)
    MATH 416 Combinatorics (3)
    MATH 421 Complex Analysis (3)
    MATH 425 Real Analysis I (3)
    MATH 440 Mathematics of Finance (3)
    MATH 450 History of Mathematics (3)
    MATH 461 Introduction to Topology (3)
    MATH 481 Probability and Statistics (3)
    MATH 487 Design of Experiments

Research Minor - Mathematics
Gives you an experience in guided mathematical research with a faculty mentor.

Mathematics - Non-Teaching: 4-YEAR PLAN 

All Mathematics majors require a minor of your choice, which is not included in the plan, but needs to be considered. 


Freshman start on Odd Year - Fall

FRESHMAN YEAR

Fall Semester
MATH 123 Calculus I

Spring Semester
MATH 125 Calculus II
MATH 221 Intro: Discrete Mathematics


SOPHOMORE YEAR

Fall Semester
MATH 225 Calculus III
MATH 321 Differential Equations

Spring Semester
MATH 425 Real Analysis I
MATH 315 Linear Algebra
MATH Elective*


JUNIOR YEAR

Fall Semester
Math Elective(s)*

Spring Semester
MATH 413 Abstract Algebra I
MATH 481 Probability and Statistics
MATH Elective*


SENIOR YEAR

Fall Semester
Math Elective(s)*

Spring Semester
Math Elective(s)*


* Professional Electives – Mathematics Majors need three professional electives


Every Third Fall – MATH Electives
MATH 411 Theory of Numbers* (two digit year = 3k)
MATH 450 History of Mathematics* (two digit year = 3k+1)
MATH 416 Combinatorics* (two digit year = 3k+2)

Every Third Spring – MATH Electives
MATH 440 Mathematics of Finance* (two digit year = 3k)
MATH 461 Introduction to Topology* (two digit year = 3k+1)
MATH 421 Complex Analysis* (two digit year = 3k+2)


* Please refer to the course rotation guide located under the Registration and Records link at www.BHSU.edu to determine when courses are offered.

Mathematics - Non-Teaching: 4-YEAR PLAN 

All Mathematics majors require a minor of your choice, which is not included in the plan, but needs to be considered. 


Freshman start on Even Year - Fall

FRESHMAN YEAR

Fall Semester
MATH 123 Calculus I

Spring Semester
MATH 125 Calculus II
MATH 221 Intro: Discrete Mathematics


SOPHOMORE YEAR

Fall Semester
MATH 225 Calculus III
MATH 316 Discrete Mathematics*

Spring Semester
MATH 413 Abstract Algebra I
MATH 481 Probability and Statistics
MATH Elective*


JUNIOR YEAR

Fall Semester
MATH 425 Real Analysis I
MATH 315 Linear Algebra
MATH Elective*

Spring Semester
MATH 413 Abstract Algebra I
MATH 481 Probability and Statistics
MATH Elective*


SENIOR YEAR

Fall Semester
Math Elective(s)*

Spring Semester
Math Elective(s)*


* Professional Electives – Mathematics Majors need three professional electives


Every Third Fall – MATH Electives
MATH 411 Theory of Numbers* (two digit year = 3k)
MATH 450 History of Mathematics* (two digit year = 3k+1)
MATH 416 Combinatorics* (two digit year = 3k+2)

Every Third Spring – MATH Electives
MATH 440 Mathematics of Finance* (two digit year = 3k)
MATH 461 Introduction to Topology* (two digit year = 3k+1)
MATH 421 Complex Analysis* (two digit year = 3k+2)


* Please refer to the course rotation guide located under the Registration and Records link at www.BHSU.edu to determine when courses are offered.

Mathematics Teaching: 4-YEAR PLAN 

A minor is not required with this major. 


Freshman start on Odd Year - Fall

Late Summer - Internet Course (if needed)
MATH 120 Trigonometry

FRESHMAN YEAR

Fall Semester
MATH 123 Calculus I
ENGL 101 Composition I
PSYC 101 General Psychology
Natural Science elective w/lab

Spring Semester
MATH 125 Calculus II
MATH 221 Intro: Discrete Mathematics
SPCM 101 Fundamentals of Speech
ENGL 201 Composition II
Natural Science elective w/lab


SOPHOMORE YEAR

Fall Semester
MATH 225 Calculus III
MATH 321 Differential Equations
SPED 405 Educ. Sec. Students w/Disabilities
WEL 100 & 100L Wellness & Lab
Arts & Humanities Elective - 3 credits

Spring Semester
MATH 425 Real Analysis I
MATH 315 Linear Algebra
MATH Elective* and/or Social Science elective
EDFN 295 Practicum: Pre-Admission
EDFN 338 Foundations of Am. Education
EPSY 302 Educational Psychology


**Submit Application to the Professional Teacher Program.

JUNIOR YEAR

Fall Semester
MATH 361 Modern Geometry
MATH Elective*
EPSY 428 Child & Adolescent Development
Arts & Humanities Elective
Additional MATH Elective* and/or Social Science elective

Spring Semester
MATH 413 Abstract Algebra I
MATH 481 Probability and Statistics
EDFN 365 Computer-Based Technology & Learning
INED 411 SD Indian Studies
MATH Elective* (if needed) and/or Social Science elective (if needed)
Arts & Humanities Elective


SENIOR YEAR

Fall Semester
MLED 480 Middle Level Methods
SEED 408 Planning, Managing and Assessing the 7-12 Diverse Classroom
SEED 450 7-12 Reading & Content Literacy
SEED 495 Practicum
SEED 418 7-12 Math Methods
Arts & Humanities elective

Spring Semester
SEED 488 7-12 Student Teaching
EDFN 475 Human Relations


* Professional Electives – Mathematics Majors need three professional electives


Every Third Fall – MATH Electives
MATH 411 Theory of Numbers* (two digit year = 3k)
MATH 450 History of Mathematics* (two digit year = 3k+1)
MATH 416 Combinatorics* (two digit year = 3k+2)

Every Third Spring – MATH Electives
MATH 440 Mathematics of Finance* (two digit year = 3k)
MATH 461 Introduction to Topology* (two digit year = 3k+1)
MATH 421 Complex Analysis* (two digit year = 3k+2)


* Please refer to the course rotation guide located under the Registration and Records link at www.BHSU.edu to determine when courses are offered.

Mathematics - Teaching: 4-YEAR PLAN 

A minor is not required with this major.


Freshman start on Even Year - Fall

Late Summer - Internet Course (if needed)
MATH 120 Trigonometry

FRESHMAN YEAR

Fall Semester
MATH 123 Calculus I
ENGL 101 Composition I
PSYC 101 General Psychology
Natural Science elective w/lab

Spring Semester
MATH 125 Calculus II
MATH 221 Intro: Discrete Mathematics
SPCM 101 Fundamentals of Speech
ENGL 201 Composition II
Natural Science elective w/lab


SOPHOMORE YEAR

Fall Semester
MATH 225 Calculus III
MATH 316 Discrete Mathematics*
SPED 405 Educ. Sec. Students w/Disabilities
WEL 100 & 100L Wellness & Lab
Arts & Humanities Elective - 3 credits

Spring Semester
MATH 413 Abstract Algebra I
MATH 481 Probability and Statistics
MATH Elective* and/or Social Science elective
EDFN 295 Practicum: Pre-Admission
EDFN 338 Foundations of Am. Education
EPSY 302 Educational Psychology


**Submit Application to the Professional Teacher Program.

JUNIOR YEAR

Fall Semester
BADM 321 Differential Equations
MATH 361 Modern Geometry
MATH Elective* and/or Social Science elective
EPSY 428 Child & Adolescent Development
Arts & Humanities Elective

Spring Semester
MATH 425 Real Analysis I
MATH 315 Linear Algebra
EDFN 365 Computer-Based Technology & Learning
INED 411 SD Indian Studies
MATH Elective* (if needed) and/or Social Science elective (if needed)
Arts & Humanities Elective


SENIOR YEAR

Fall Semester
MLED 480 Middle Level Methods
SEED 408 Planning, Managing and Assessing the 7-12 Diverse Classroom
SEED 450 7-12 Reading & Content Literacy
SEED 495 Practicum
SEED 418 7-12 Math Methods
Arts & Humanities elective

Spring Semester
SEED 488 7-12 Student Teaching
EDFN 475 Human Relations


* Professional Electives – Mathematics Majors need three professional electives


Every Third Fall – MATH Electives
MATH 411 Theory of Numbers* (two digit year = 3k)
MATH 450 History of Mathematics* (two digit year = 3k+1)
MATH 416 Combinatorics* (two digit year = 3k+2)

Every Third Spring – MATH Electives
MATH 440 Mathematics of Finance* (two digit year = 3k)
MATH 461 Introduction to Topology* (two digit year = 3k+1)
MATH 421 Complex Analysis* (two digit year = 3k+2)


* Please refer to the course rotation guide located under the Registration and Records link at www.BHSU.edu to determine when courses are offered.

Actuary - Solve real-world problems, involving money (sometimes billions of dollars), probabilities, and future events. Using statistics, determine how much different sectors of the population should pay for insurance and whether or not Social Security taxes should be reduced. Most actuaries work for insurance companies or consulting firms.

Imaging Scientist- Put your mathematical and computer abilities to good use. Use linear algebra and physics principles to create computer-graphics programs, such as photo-editing and retouching applications. Use your imagination and the capabilities of modern technology to create any number of fun programs for yourself or meaningful applications for work. The best part? You can work at home and choose your own hours!

Market Researcher - Determine if your company’s services best meet your customers’ needs. Design consumer satisfaction surveys, follow your company’s industry through the press and other published studies, and supply management with needed information. As a market researcher, it’s important to understand and communicate statistics to see whether your customers are being satisfied.

Economist- Assess the financial situation of a region or industry. Analyze data, observe previous trends, and use modeling techniques to predict upcoming financial changes. Most careers in economics require a strong foundation in mathematics, with a special emphasis on calculus, statistics, and probability.

Aerospace Mathematician - Want to shoot for the stars, literally? As an aerospace mathematician, you can utilize your math skills to model the different aspects of a spacecraft, to model data taken from the spacecraft, and to determine the optimal info from the data. If assisting in NASA missions is in your future, you’ll need a solid background in engineering, physics, and astronomy.

Environmental Mathematician -As an environmental mathematician, you work as a member of a team to tackle a specific environmental problem, such as predicting how much gas escapes from storage tanks based on weather conditions. This never-boring job requires both logical and quantitative thinking, and often involves traveling to interesting places. Perhaps the best part of this job, however, is being aware that you’re helping to protect Mother Earth.

Law Partner - What does math have to do with law? The approach to solving problems in both areas is much the same. In law, you start with a basic legal principle or proposition, apply the principle to the facts at hand and reach a conclusion, much as you do with a mathematical function. In cases where the conclusion is not so clear-cut, you have to consider various factors, similar to a multi-variable equation. If you enjoy the logic and problem-solving aspects of math, then a career in law may be just your thing.

Budget Analyst - Determine how money is needed by a company/organization. Use extensive algebraic formulas to calculate which sectors of the company need the most money in order to thrive. As a budget analyst, the decisions you make can largely affect the future of your company. Skills in algebra, statistics, and mathematical modeling are essential for this profession.

Computer Programmer - Design, develop, and implement business application systems by writing complex programming codes. The most important part of programming is the logic behind the code. This is where a strong background in mathematics comes into play, as it helps to analyze complicated requirements and develop clear and concise systems.

Accountant - Being an accountant involves keeping, auditing, and inspecting the financial records of individuals or businesses. Based on this information, an accountant then prepares financial and tax reports. Math plays a big part not only in totaling debits and credits, but is also used in many other ways. For example, statistical sampling techniques are used to determine the probability of errors occurring in the financial statements.

Numerical Analyst - Develop the best possible mathematical methods and algorithms to solve a certain problem. An example would be designing a satellite computer capable of withstanding the cosmic ray radiation found in outer space. As a numerical analyst, you blend mathematics, computer science, engineering, and physics in order to come up with the best solution for the task at hand.

Biostatistician - Statistics aren’t limited to math problems and sports trivia; they also have an important place in biology. In fact, statistics are vital within the medical community. For example, by using statistics and modeling techniques, you can logically connect environmental factors with certain diseases. Because biostatistics is based on using statistics to solve problems and the fact that research uncovers more problems than it solves, there is never a boring moment for a biostatistician.

What are the employment opportunities with a Degree in Mathematics? Will it be difficult to find a job with a mathematics degree? Why should I earn a Degree in Mathematics?

Hopefully, you will find the answer to these questions and more in the links listed below. Generally the problem solving skills developed on the way to earning a degree in mathematics is highly respected in the business world. While one may not solve differential equations in their chosen field, the skills learned in this and similar classes are often considered extremely helpful in career advancement. Please browse the following links to find out more.

  • Monster.com -- Upon logging onto Monster.com, click on the Job Search button. Use "mathematics" for the key word search and press search. At any given time, there are usually 1000 jobs listed on Monster.com for people with Mathematics Degrees.
      • In evaluating Monster.com and other career pages below, it is possible to group occupations for people with degrees in mathematics into five sub-categories. If you are interested in a particular category, we recommend that you pick up a related minor.
        • Math and Technology. Minor in MIS.
        • Math and Business. Minor in Business (with a focus on accounting.)
        • Math publication. This includes technical brochures and manuals. Minor in English. (with a focus on writing.)
        • Math and Research. Focus on the branch of knowledge you are interested in research. Consider an advance degree.
        • Math education.Obtain a Math-Ed Degree.
  • BHSU's Career Center -- When reading Monster.com, you may recognize that they generally require experience.  So where do you find entry level positions?  Visit the BHSU's Career Center.  The Center's staff will assist you in every step of the process of finding employment. We Highly Recommend That You Visit Your Campus Career Center.
  • Consider a Graduate Degree.Many students do not consider advanced degrees because they are concerned about the cost. However, most graduate schools will offer a teaching assistanceship (TA) which will pay your tuition and offer a reasonable stipend for living expenses. The dollar amounts very from university to university. For more information contact any math faculty member. If you are interested in this route, work hard to learn as much as possible and keep your grades up as high as possible.
  • Careers that Count -- Mathematics is a field for both Men and Women. This article is written by the Association for Women in Mathematics. The article profiles several women and there careers in Mathematics and related fields.
  • Math Related Careers (see tab above) -- Tyler Steinle, BHSU class of 2004, paraphrased several descriptions of careers from the text: 101 Careers in Mathematics, second edn., Andrew Sterrett, Editor, 2002, The Mathematical Association of America. He has included a link to an appropriate website.
  • American Mathematics Society -- This is the home page for the American Mathematical Society. They have a page which discusses careers at Mathematical Sciences Career Information.
  • Mathematical Association of America -- This is the home page for the Mathematical Association of America. They have a page which discusses careers at Careers and Employment Resources for Mathematical Students.
  • National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) -- This is the home page for the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. This group promotes mathematics education for educators in grade k-12.
  • Actuarial information -- Actuaries are people who study the "Risk" involved in running a business. They evaluate the likelihood of future events and work to design practices which will reduce (or minimize the effect of) the likelihood of undesirable events.
  • Famous Non-Mathematicians -- Dr. Dale Buske at St. Cloud University has posted a list of famous people who majored in math and worked in occupations that are not considered mathematically related. The list includes basketball stars Michael Jordan and David Robinson.

Career Opportunities

Mathematics majors are able to find careers in a variety of fields:

  • Software Engineering
  • Business Management
  • Tachnical Writing
  • Banking
  • Market Research
  • Data Processing
  • Statistical Processing
  • Law School
  • Teaching

  Learn more about careers